Fire Following Earthquake
Earthquakes break water mains and gas lines. The broken gas lines cause fires.
The broken water mains cannot supply fire fighters with water from fire hydrants to fight the fires.

A new type of Portable Hose System is proposed here that can move water over very long distances.
The long distances are achieved by the use of many diesel booster pumps can be controlled by a digital network.

The water can be pumped from regions with working hydrants TO the areas where the hydrants
don't work.

The same system can be used to deliver emergency water to the populations who have lost their drinking water supply.



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The California Seismic Commission published a report titled
"Water Supply in regard to Fire Following Earthquake".

Relay Pumping is the technique of using many fire pumpers to pump water through hoses over long distances.
The pumpers are spaced approximately one mile apart, and are needed to boost the water pressure because
of pressure loss in each mile of hose. 

The report concluded that Relay Pumping was needed to deliver water to fight fires in areas
where an earthquake had broken water mains. Because of broken mains, the fire hydrants
would not supply water to firefighting equipment.




The report can be seen HERE


IFFC, LLC has developed a new type of Digitally Controlled Relay Pumping System.
The system will be described in following pages.

Chief Javier Mainar, of the San Diego Fire Department, was a participant in the Fire Following Earthquake study.
IFFC contacted him and described the proposed Digitally Controlled Relay Pumping System.

He replied:

"Thank you for sharing your proposed solution to management of long distance relay pumping operations. 
I agree such an operation would (currently) be equipment and labor intensive.

As you note, many fire departments, including my own, lack the proper equipment to perform such operations. 
An earthquake compromised water delivery system will certainly pose a challenge to us all.

Regrettably, there is little funding available to purchase what is needed, let alone support research and development efforts such as the one you have undertaken.  I applaud your work and thank you for sharing it with me.

I wish you success in spreading your message and striving to implement what you have proposed to minimize the number of pump operators needed to control these operations.




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